Gare Viger - Site history header

Site History

THE HISTORIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THIS SITE GOES BACK AS FAR AS WHEN MONTREAL WAS A FORTIFIED CITY IN THE 1700’S DURING THE NEW-FRANCE ERA.

The original Citadel that protected the walled city from enemies travelling by boat up the St Lawrence was in the direct vicinity of where the Chateau now stands.

The Chateau Viger was designed by renowned architect Bruce Price, who also designed the Chateau Frontenac (Québec City, 1893) and the Banff Springs Hotel (Banff, 1887). It was built in 1898 in the traditional British railway hotel style: trains would come in directly in the hotel lobby to maximize travellers’ convenience.

The train station in the hotel replaced the Dalhousie Station which still stands next to the site on Notre-Dame Street. In 1912, a new station on Berri Street (Gare Berri), attached to the Chateau, was inaugurated so that trains would no longer terminate in the building itself.

Today, It is the only site in North America with three train stations of historical significance still standing fully intact.

As the economic centre of the city gradually moved west, the hotel closed in 1935. The City of Montreal bought the Chateau in 1951 and moved part of its administration offices into the building.

The building and surrounding site were bought from the city in 2006 by a group of investors that lay the groundwork for the vision of the development underway today.

In early 2012, Jesta Group & its partners acquired the site, with a mission and vision to revitalise the Chateau and re-energise this key strategic site in the city.


Today, It is the only site in North America with three train stations of historical significance still standing fully intact.